Semantic Desktop

Semantic Content Access using Domain-Independent NLP Ontologies

Abstract

We present a lightweight, user-centred approach for document navigation and analysis that is based on an ontology of text mining results. This allows us to bring the result of existing text mining pipelines directly to end users. Our approach is domain-independent and relies on existing NLP analysis tasks such as automatic multi-document summarization, clustering, question-answering, and opinion mining. Users can interactively trigger semantic processing services for tasks such as analyzing product reviews, daily news, or other document sets.

Leverage of OWL-DL axioms in a Contact Centre for Technical Product Support

Abstract

Real-time access to complex knowledge is a business driver in the contact centre environment. In this paper we outline for the domain of telecom technical product support a knowledge sharing paradigm in which a desktop client annotates named entities in technical documents with canonical names, class names or relevant class axioms, derived from an ontology by means of a web services framework. We described the system and its core components; OWL-DL telecom hardware ontology, ontological-natural language processing pipeline, an ontology axiom?extractor; and the Semantic Assistants framework.

Semantic Assistants: SOA for Text Mining

With the rapidly growing amount of information available, employees spend an ever-increasing proportion of their time searching for the right information. Information overload has become a serious threat to productivity. We address this challenge with a service-oriented architecture that integrates semantic natural language processing services into desktop applications.

Semantic Assistants – User-Centric Natural Language Processing Services for Desktop Clients

Abstract

Semantic Assistants Workflow OverviewSemantic Assistants Workflow OverviewToday's knowledge workers have to spend a large amount of time and manual effort on creating, analyzing, and modifying textual content. While more advanced semantically-oriented analysis techniques have been developed in recent years, they have not yet found their way into commonly used desktop clients, be they generic (e.g., word processors, email clients) or domain-specific (e.g., software IDEs, biological tools). Instead of forcing the user to leave his current context and use an external application, we propose a ``Semantic Assistants'' approach, where semantic analysis services relevant for the user's current task are offered directly within a desktop application. Our approach relies on an OWL ontology model for context and service information and integrates external natural language processing (NLP) pipelines through W3C Web services.

Enhancing the OpenOffice.org Word Processor with Natural Language Processing Capabilities


Abstract

Today's knowledger workers are often overwhelmed by the vast amount of readily available natural language documents that are potentially relevant for a given task. Natural language processing (NLP) and text mining techniques can deliver automated analysis support, but they are often not integrated into commonly used desktop clients, such as word processors. We present a plug-in for the OpenOffice.org word processor Writer that allows to access any kind of NLP analysis service mediated through a service-oriented architecture. Semantic Assistants can now provide services such as information extraction, question-answering, index generation, or automatic summarization directly within an end user's application.

Engineering a Semantic Desktop for Building Historians and Architects

Page scan from 'Handbuch der Architektur'

Abstract

We analyse the requirements for an advanced semantic support of users—building historians and architects—of a multi-volume encyclopedia of architecture from the late 19th century. Novel requirements include the integration of content retrieval, content development, and automated content analysis based on natural language processing.

We present a system architecture for the detected requirements and its current implementation. A complex scenario demonstrates how a desktop supporting semantic analysis can contribute to specific, relevant user tasks.

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